Carla Russ

Carla Russ
Image Credit: © Carla Russ

International Research Training Group "Between Spaces"

Movements, Actors and Representations of Globalisation

PhD Candidate

Field of Activity

Project: “German War Propaganda in Latin America during World War I, 1914-1918”

Address Boltzmannstr. 4
14195 Berlin
Email cruss@zedat.fu-berlin.de

Academic career

Since 01/2014

Doctoral student of the International Research Training Group “Between Spaces"

Freie Universität Berlin

01/2013 - 12/2013

Qualification scholarship holder of the PhD Candidate of the International Research Training Group “Between Spaces"

Freie Universität Berlin

06/2009 - 06/2013

Student assistant at  Research Group „Governance in areas of limited statehood“ (SFB 700), Project C5

Freie Universität Berlin

10/2007 - 03/2008

Stay abroad (Erasmus) at the

Universidad de Sevilla / Spanien

10/2004 - 07/2013

Studies in Latin American Studies, Modern History and English Literature (Magister)
Thesis: „'No queremos guerra de ninguna especie en nuestra casa' – German propaganda in Chile during World War I“

Freien Universität Berlin

"German War Propaganda in Latin America during World War I, 1914-1918"


Supervisor: Prof. Dr. Stefan Rinke (Freie Universität Berlin)


 

The investigation project focuses on the analysis of European war propaganda in Latin America during Word War I. The main research questions are: how did European war propaganda create a medial space for the negotiation of imperialistic and national utopias and discourses, and what effects did the entanglement of national, regional and global dynamics in the production of propaganda have on Latin America? War propaganda was not simply conceptualized and produced in Europe and shipped overseas: many local actors and actor groups contributed actively to the production and distribution of pamphlets, newspapers and other propaganda material. Specific ideas and views on the place of Latin America in this new global context influenced the forms of representation in war propaganda. The analysis of these representations focuses on the importance of exchange between European and Latin American ideas and discourses on nation and modernity and seeks to broaden the understanding of the effects of World War I in a global perspective.