Natalia López Rico, M.A.

Historian from the National University of Colombia, Medellín, MA in Latin American Studies from the University of Chile and doctoral candidate in the same program. Her lines of work include the Latin-American cultural and urban history of nineteenth and early twentieth century, with an emphasis on comparative analysis. She currently participates in the Group of Brazilian studies at the Faculty of Philosophy and Humanities of the University of Chile.

Her doctoral research addresses the formation and genealogy of modern Latin American citizenship during the dawn of nation states, with emphasis on Chile and Brazil between 1840 and 1910. While taking into account the mainstream narratives that helped shape citizenship as a concept and practice, this paper aims to focus on seemingly "minor" discourses - a title that may as well have caused them to be so far excluded - that circulated in the form of manuals and guidebooks to morality, etiquette and good manners. This genre of pamphlets enjoyed widespread popularity throughout the 19th until well into the 20th century.

Temporalities
Zwischen Räumen
logo_sfb700
GIH
Einstein Foundation
CDOH Logo
Logo_MemoriAL