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Dr. Carolin Loysa

Carolin Loysa

Freie Universität Berlin

ZI Lateinamerika-Institut

Wissenschaftliche/r Mitarbeiter/in

Altamerikanistik/Kulturanthropologie

Adresse
Rüdesheimer Straße 54-56
14197 Berlin

Sprechstunde

Kontakt per Mail. Die Sprechstunde findet momentan per Webex statt. – Bitte mit konkretem Anliegen und bei Betreuungswunsch inkl. kurzer Forschungsskizze.

Since 7/2019                    

Scientific Assistant in Cultural and Social Anthropology (Altamerikanistik) at the Institute for Latin American Studies, Freie Universität Berlin

 

12/2019                             

Doctorate in Social and Cultural Anthropology (summa cum laude)

Title: The Precarity of Progress: Class, Race, and the Mallification of Puebla, Mexico

Supervisors: Prof. Dr. Ingrid Kummels, Prof. Dr. Carlos Alba Vega

 

12/2013–12/2019          

Doctoral student in Cultural and Social Anthropology (Altamerikanistik) at the Institute for Latin American Studies, Freie Universität Berlin

 

5/2013                          

MA Thesis in Interdisciplinary Latin American Studies

Title: The mall as central public meeting point. The emergence of new socio-spatial practices at the centro comercial Angelópolis in Puebla, Mexico

 

10/2010–5/2013            

Master Studies in Interdisciplinary Latin American Studies at the Institute for Latin American Studies, Freie Universität Berlin

 

1/2011                                

(BA) Thesis in Spanish Philology

Title: The role of Mexico City in contemporary Latin American literature: Significance and representation of the urban space in La otra cara de Rock Hudson and Los detectives salvajes

 

10/2006–9/2010            

Bachelor Studies in Spanish Philology with Latin American Studies and Portuguese-Brazilian Studies at the Institute of Romance Languages and Literatures, Freie Universität Berlin

 

7/2006                                

Abitur at the Gymnasium Westerstede Europaschule


Fellowships

 

2014–2015                        

Qualification Scholarship at the International Research Training Group “Between Spaces”: Movements, Actors and Representations of Globalisation, funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG)

 

2015–2018                        

PhD fellow at the International Research Training Group “Between Spaces”: Movements, Actors and Representations of Globalisation, funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG)

 

Academic activities / organisation of conferences

 

2016–2018                        

Spokesperson of the PhD candidates at the International Research Training Group “Between Spaces”:Movements, Actors and Representations of Globalisation

 

02–09/2014                      

Part of the organization team of the 17th International AHILA Congress in Berlin organized by the International Research Training Group “Between Spaces”:  Movements, Actors and Representations of Globalisation

 

6–11/2011                         

Organization of conference ‘European- indigenous Trans/Mission: Translation Strategies in Colonial Latin America’ at the Institute for Latin American Studies

 

3–7/2010                           

Internship at the National Institute of Anthropology and History in Puebla, Mexico

 

8/2008                                

Internship at the Ethnological Museum of Berlin (preparation for permanent display on South American lowlands)


(WiSe 2019-2020) Seminar: Interdisciplinary Latin American studies

 

(SoSe 2020) Seminar: Urban Anthropology

 

 

Research Interests

Social Networks between Mexico and Lebanon

Strolling as expression of feminist activism – exploring the notion of the Flâneuse

 

  • Urban Studies
  • Capitalism and the Spatial Fix
  • Material Cultures
  • Consumption and Affective economies
  • Race and class studies

 

Completed doctoral project

 

The Precarity of Progress.

Class, Race, and the Mallification of Puebla, Mexico

 

Supervisors: Univ.-Prof. Dr. phil. Ingrid Kummels, Univ.-Prof. Dr. Carlos Alba Vega

 

Short Abstract

 

The dissertation explores the everyday practices of the upper middle classes in one of Mexico’s most emblematic shopping malls, located in the city of Puebla. The Angelópolis mall is embedded in an extensive urbanization project that was endorsed by the local and federal government and served as a structuring element for the spatial reconfiguration of the city, which arguably enhanced social urban fragmentation. This study addresses the consequences/results of extreme neoliberal urbanization in relation to the city’s middle classes as the putative beneficiaries of these urban developments. The mall functions as an object of study that is constituted as a spatial-material epitome of neoliberal values.

Exploring the mall-realities of the upper middle classes – advertised as the target group for the mall – and their practices of distinction in spatial proximity to others reveals deep-rooted connections between class and race discriminations in this urban society. These are displayed in the narratives and practices of the upper middle classes in the mall as they seek to maintain social status in a context of increasing social and economic precarity.

The thesis further displays historic continuities of urban functions that can be related to the mall, underscoring the importance of considering the specific local and social peculiarities and possible repercussions of the implementations of these urban projects, especially in a postcolonial context. Through this, this study also centrally questions the often-heard phrase that Mexico is classist rather than racist by paying attention to the social disparities in(side) the middle classes.

In this study, social and economic inequality – though there is undoubtedly a relation – do not necessarily describe the same thing, as is often assumed in studies on the middle classes. On a macro scale, the relation between social and economic factors is an interesting indicator for social mobility in the context of neoliberal urbanization in colonized countries. It shows that social status can be negotiated separately from financial status by the dominant groups, revealing their own precarity and vehemently contradicting the promises of neoliberal free-market ideology. It displays the precarity of progress, with progress as the central notion of this ideology, and reveals how the chance to upward social mobility is not equally available to all actors.

 

(2019) (Co-editor together with Hernández Suárez, Moszczynska et al.) Giros espacio-temporales: Repensando los entrelazamientos globales desde América Latina. Edición Tranvía, Berlin.

 

(2019) Theory of the athleisure class– On sportswear and the displaying of distinction in a Mexican mall, in: Hernández Suárez, Diana Marisol et al. (eds.)Giros espacio-temporales: Repensando los entrelazamientos globales desde América Latina, Edición Tranvía, Berlin , pp. 79-102.

 

(2015) Of food courts and other demons: shopping malls in Mexico as new centers for urban life, in: Revista Iluminuras v. 16, n. 37, p. 32-43.